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De Stijl (Neoplasticism) reproduction paintings

De Stijl (Neoplasticism)

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De Stijl (Neoplasticism)

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The Dutch art movement known as De Stijl, which translates to "The Style," was established in Leiden in 1917. Artists and architects united to form what became known as the De Stijl movement. De Stijl is sometimes used more specifically to refer to a Dutch artistic movement that emerged between 1917 and 1931. De Stijl artists called for pure abstraction and universality via a reduction to the fundamentals of form and color, employing only vertical and horizontal lines and black, white, and primary colors to create a minimalist visual composition

The Dutch artist, designer, writer, and critic Theo van Doesburg (1883-1931) established a magazine named De Stijl to spread the group's ideas. Principal members besides van Doesburg included the architects Gerrit Rietveld (1888-1964), Robert van 't Hoff (1887-1979), and J. J. P. Oud; the painters Piet Mondrian (1872-1944), Vilmos Huszár (1884-1960), and Bart van der Leck (1876-1958); and the writers and theorists J. J. P. Oud (1898-1973) and Bart van der Leck (1876-1958). The term "neoplasticism," short for "new plastic art," describes the aesthetic theory upon which the collective's creations were based (or Nieuwe Belding in Dutch).

In his article "Neo-Plasticism in Pictorial Art," Piet Mondrian defines the parameters of neoplasticism. He says, "This new plastic notion will overlook the particulars of appearance, that is, natural shape and color. Instead, it should be expressed via simplifying form and color in things like stark black and white or primary colors. With these limitations, his artwork is limited to black, white, and primary colors; squares and rectangles; and straight, horizontal, and vertical lines. The geometric principles of the straight line, the square, and the rectangle were central to the De Stijl movement; they were also combined with a strong asymmetry, the use of pure primary colors, black and white, and the relationship between positive and negative elements in an arrangement of non-objective forms and lines.

According to Curl, Gottfried Semper's Der Stil in den technischen and tektonischen Künsten or Praktische sthetik (1861-3) was misunderstood to promote materialism and functionalism, thus the moniker "De Stijl." De Stijl painters, who practiced a style known as Neo-Plasticism, had a "plastic vision" that they believed could take viewers beyond the transitory look of the natural world and place them in direct touch with an eternal reality. De Stijl was a Dutch art movement that advocated the use of solely horizontal and vertical lines and rectangular shapes in architecture and painting. In addition, they had just three values and three colors in their formal vocabulary: red, yellow, and blue. In place of symmetry, the compositions found harmony via counterpoint. This aspect of the movement exemplifies the second definition of Stijl, which is "a pillar, jamb, or support," and may be seen most clearly in the use of crossing joints in carpentry.

Most of the group's three-dimensional works have layers or planes of vertical and horizontal lines that don't meet in the middle, giving each component room to breathe. The Red and Blue Chair and the Rietveld Schröder House are two of his other works with this quality.

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